Cuban Treefrog
Osteopilus septentrionalis

CLASS: Amphibia
ORDER: Anura
FAMILY: Hylidae

SIZE:
1.5 to 5 inches; females much larger than many males.

RANGE:
Northern West Indies, especially Cuban and Bahamas. Introduced into Florida and established along both coasts. Likely to spread.

HABITAT:
Any moist area with vegetation or hiding places. In Florida usually found near homes and gardens and may call from tall orange trees.

DIET:

  • Wild - Insects, spiders, snails, small frogs. Do not house with other frogs.
  • Zoo - Large crickets.

DESCRIPTION:
A long-legged, stout, somewhat warty treefrog with gigantic toe disks. The eyes are bright gold. Most specimens are grayish to olive green with darker blotches and spots.

FACTS:

  • Skin secretions are very toxic; hands must be washed after handling; do not put the frog near eyes, nose, or mouth.
  • Unlike our native treefrogs, calling males have a pair of inflated sacks under the throat, not a single marble-like bubble.
  • Males may live only a year or two but females can live a decade.

YOUNG:
In Florida, breeding occurs mostly between April and August, females laying about 200 eggs in several small groups. Tadpoles mature in less than two months.

STATUS:
Considered a destructive, invasive, non-native species. Could become established accidentally in New Orleans as not always killed by freezing weather.

REFERENCES:

  • A Field Guide to Florida Reptiles and Amphibians. R. D. Bartlett & Patricia P. Bartlett.
  • A Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians. Eastern and Central North America. Roger Conant & Joseph T. Collins.